PROGRESSIVE WEB APPLICATION VERSION

PUBS AND RESTAURANTS AND HOTELSPHOTOGRAPHED BY WILLIAM MURPHY

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BLAA BLAA BLAA IN KILKENNYNOT BLAH BLAH BLAH AS ASSOCIATED WITH GRETA THUNBERG

BLAA BLAA BLAA CAFE IN KILKENNY
A bla, or Waterford Blaa, is a doughy, white bread bun (roll) speciality, particularly associated with Waterford, Ireland. It is currently made in Waterford and South Co. Kilkenny.

Blaas are sold in two varieties: "soft" and "crusty". Soft blaas are slightly sweet, malt flavour, light but firm in texture and melt in the mouth. Crusty blaas are crunchy at first bite, then chewy with a subtle malt taste and a pleasing bitter aftertaste from the well cooked, dark crust.

ERIC'S PUB IN LIMERICK SAINT JOSEPH'S STREET - EMMET PLACE

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This pub was owned and operated by Eric and Florence Lynch but unfortunately, for health reasons, they decided to close it in 1997. Florence and Eric, who passed away within a year of each other and were very well known and much liked in Limerick.

THE HILL PUBIS NOW BACK IN ACTION

THE HILL PUB IS BACK IN ACTION

THE GREAT EASTERN BAR NEWTOWNARDS ROAD IN EAST BELFAST MARCH 2019

Described as a lovely pub in the heart of the East Belfast community, Established in 1890. The Megain Memorial Church of the Nazarene is nearby on the same side of the street and I visited the area to photograph the church rather than the pub.
THE GREAT EASTERN BAR

THE HAVEN PUB WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1866 DAVIS STREET IN LIMERICK

THE HAVEN HAS CEASED TRADING
According to Google Maps this pub, established in 1866, has ceased trading.

Back in 2016 I came across the following message online: :We at The Haven Bar would like to thank all our customers & friends for your understanding while we carry out the necessary works and renovations to the premises .Good news is that renovations are progressing well and we hope to be reopened soon. We would like to thank you all for your support and well wishes. Looking forward to seeing you soon."

The owner of McCoys John Costello was interviewed by a local newspaper and they indicated that they had the Limerick bar stripped, transported and rebuilt as an authentic Irish bar in Alicante.

FRED ZEPPLINSPARLIAMENT STREET CORK MAY 2022

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THE VENUE PUB AND BEER GARDENBALLINTEMPLE VILLAGE IN CORK MAY 2022

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THE TEMPLE INNBALLINTEMPLE VILLAGE IN CORK MAY 2022

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WYLAM CHINESE RESTAURANTVICTORIA CROSS ROAD IN CORK MAY 2022

WYLAM CHINESE RESTAURANT IN CORK MAY 2022

KINSELLA'S BARNEW ROAD LIMERICK APRIL 2022

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THE BEGGARMAN PUB98 STREET AND GILLABBEY STREET MAY 2022

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FORMER RYAN HOTELENNIS ROAD APRIL 2022

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PERY'S HOTEL LIMERICK APRIL 2022

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THE ETAP HOTEL MARCH 2022 WHY ARE THERE NO STREET FACING WINDOWS

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FILTHY McNASTYS PUB AND NIGHTCLUB PHOTOGRAPHED MARCH 2022

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THE FINDLATER HENNESSY'S PUB ON DORSET STREET

Friendly cafe bar, with comfortable seating and food served seven days a week. Also, visit The Snug, the smallest bar in Dublin! Great place to watch live sport.

The North Lotts in Dublin city centre is a four acre area bordered Bachelor’s Walk on the quays, Middle Abbey Street, Lower Liffey Street and Litton Lane. This area along the River Liffey was originally slob land.

In 1674 merchant Jonathan Amory leased a piece of land along the north bank of the River Liffey from the city authorities. He set about developing the area before dividing it into lotts and selling it to other developers, thereby giving the city centre portion of land the name North Lotts.


THE LOTTSPUB AND RESTAURANT

Friendly cafe bar, with comfortable seating and food served seven days a week. Also, visit The Snug, the smallest bar in Dublin! Great place to watch live sport.

The North Lotts in Dublin city centre is a four acre area bordered Bachelor’s Walk on the quays, Middle Abbey Street, Lower Liffey Street and Litton Lane. This area along the River Liffey was originally slob land.

In 1674 merchant Jonathan Amory leased a piece of land along the north bank of the River Liffey from the city authorities. He set about developing the area before dividing it into lotts and selling it to other developers, thereby giving the city centre portion of land the name North Lotts.

THE LOTTS PUB AND RESTAURANT 001
THE LOTTS PUB AND RESTAURANT 002

VIEWS OF THE NEW HAMPTON BY HILTON OPENED FOR BOOKINGS 27 SEPTEMBER 2021?

According to various booking sites this hotel opened for bookings on the 27th September 2021 but my research indicates that it will not open to the public until 25th March 2022.

This new hotel has replaced River House at Chancery Street has been vacant since the motor taxation service moved out in 2007. It was owned for about 15 years by developers Joe and Patrick Linders who are best known for their involvement in the revival of the Smithfield area of Dublin.

River House was a 5-storey office block on Chancery Street, Dublin. It was described as a "brutalist eyesore" by the Sunday Times. It was ugly be any definition.

Permission to build River House was granted in 1972, and the building was completed in 1973. It had curtain walling at ground and 1st floor levels, with 4 additional storeys above with pre-cast cladding. The architect of the building has been disputed. Frank McDonald attributed it to John Thompson and Partners, but this led to a libel suit during which it was stated that "neither John or David Thompson of the firm John Thompson and Partners had anything to do with the design or erection of River House". It appears to have been the work of Patrick J. Sheahan and Partners.

After a dispute between the Department of Justice and the Dublin Corporation as to who would occupy the building, the Corporation established its motor tax office in the office block, and for many years it was Dublin's only motor tax office. The building stood vacant from the late 2000s, and attracted anti-social behaviour.

River House was described as "scourge" to the area, and "is considered to be of little or no architectural merit". It was recorded by the Dublin City Council as a dangerous building in February 2016.

River House was initially purchased by Joe and Patrick Linders, who were involved in the redevelopment of parts of the Smithfield area.[9] The building was purchased by Melonmount Ltd in 2017 for €8 million, and permission was sought to demolish it and replace it with a hotel. The financier, Derek Quinlan, was an advisor on the deal. An Taisce have been critical of the proposed replacement building, describing it as "monolithic" and "lumpen". River House was demolished in 2018.

HAMPTON BY HILTON

This site is currently being rebuilt in the background and the current major project is to switch to PWA during 2022 and this has proved to be more difficult than expected.

A progressive web application (PWA), commonly known as a progressive web app, is a type of application software delivered through the web, built using common web technologies including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and WebAssembly. It is intended to work on any platform that uses a standards-compliant browser, including both desktop and mobile devices.

As of 2021, PWA features are supported to varying degrees by Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Firefox for Android, and Microsoft Edge but not by Firefox for desktop.


Since a progressive web app is a type of webpage or website known as a web application, they do not require separate bundling or distribution. Developers can just publish the web application online, ensure that it meets baseline "installability requirements", and users will be able to add the application to their home screen. Publishing the app to digital distribution systems like Apple App Store or Google Play is optional.

In 2015, designer Frances Berriman and Google Chrome engineer Alex Russell coined the term "progressive web apps" to describe apps taking advantage of new features supported by modern browsers, including service workers and web app manifests, that let users upgrade web apps to progressive web applications in their native operating system (OS). Google then put significant efforts into promoting PWA development for Android. Firefox introduced support for service workers in 2016, and Microsoft Edge and Apple Safari followed in 2018, making service workers available on all major systems.

By 2019, PWAs were supported by desktop versions of most browsers, including Microsoft Edge (on Windows) and Google Chrome[ (on Windows, macOS, Chrome OS and Linux).

In December 2020, Firefox for desktop abandoned implementation of PWAs (specifically, removed the prototype "site-specific browser" configuration that had been available as an experimental feature). A Firefox architect noted: "The signal I hope we are sending is that PWA support is not coming to desktop Firefox anytime soon." Mozilla still plans to support PWAs on Android.


Since a progressive web app is a type of webpage or website known as a web application, they do not require separate bundling or distribution. In particular, there is no requirement for developers or users to install the web apps via digital distribution systems like Apple App Store, Google Play, Microsoft Store or Samsung Galaxy Store. To varying degrees, the major app stores support publication of PWAs.[1] Google Play, Microsoft Store,[19] and Samsung Galaxy Store support PWAs, but Apple App Store does not. Microsoft Store publishes some qualifying PWAs automatically (even without app authors' request) after discovering them via Bing indexing.
Progressive web apps are all designed to work on any browser that is compliant with the appropriate web standards. As with other cross-platform solutions, the goal is to help developers build cross-platform apps more easily than they would with native apps. Progressive web apps employ the progressive enhancement web development strategy.

Some progressive web apps use an architectural approach called the App Shell Model.[ In this model, service workers store the Basic User Interface or "shell" of the responsive web design web application in the browser's offline cache. This model allows for PWAs to maintain native-like use with or without web connectivity. This can improve loading time, by providing an initial static frame, a layout or architecture into which content can be loaded progressively as well as dynamically.

The technical baseline criteria for a site to be considered a progressive web app and therefore "installable" by browsers were described by Russell in a follow-up post[23] and updated since:

Originate from a secure origin. Served over TLS and green padlock displays (no active mixed content). Progressive web apps must be served via HTTPS to ensure user privacy, security, and content authenticity.

Register a service worker with a fetch handler. Progressive web apps must use service workers to create programmable content caches. Unlike regular HTTP web cache, which caches content after the first use and then relies on various heuristics to guess when content is no longer needed, programmable caches can explicitly prefetch content in advance before it's used for the first time and explicitly discard it when it is no longer needed. This requirement helps pages to be accessible offline or on low quality networks.

Reference a web app manifest. The manifest must contain at least the five key properties: name or short_name, start_url, and display (with a value of standalone, fullscreen or minimal-ui), and icons (with 192px and a 512px versions). Information contained in manifest makes PWAs easily shareable via a URL, discoverable by a search engines, and alleviates complex installation procedures (but PWAs still can be listed in a third-party app store).[27] Furthermore, PWAs support native app-style interactions and navigation, including being added to home screen, displaying splashscreens, etc.



JACKIE'S BAR 40 FRANCIS STREET

90's inspired boozer now open on 40 Francis St, Dublin 8. I don't know when this actually opened its doors to the public but I do not remember seeing it before today.


THE LIBERTY BELLE33 FRANCIS STREET

There is a sculpture named the "liberty Bell" in a nearby public park and the pub is located at 33 Francis Street which is in an area known as "The Liberties".


THE TIGER AND THE LUCKY DUCKAUNGIER STREET

The Tiger Mural predates the current Year Of The Tiger [Lunar New Year].

The owners describe the Lucky Duck as " an elegant neighbourhood pub and cocktails bar where we are making the old new again."

The building, dating from 1890 and is was at one stage known as Aungier House, has been vacant for at least twenty years and while I went to Kevin Street College, nearby, I cannot remember the name that it operated under but according to some of my fellow students it sold the cheapest pint in Dublin (I never knew if that was a recommendation or a warning).

I am not an expert when it comes to Dublin Pubs but to the best of my knowledge The Lucky Duck was originally to be called The Dutch Billy, after an architectural style of building that was once common in Dublin but when it was realised that the name might be considered to be a reference to William of Orange that idea was dropped.

Note: Dublin’s Dutch Billys [Gable fronted houses] were reputedly named after William of Orange, and their arrival in Dublin is generally attributed to an influx of French Huguenots after 1685 and to Dutch and Flemish Protestants fleeing persecution after 1690.

I would have gone with Dutch Billy.


THE HAIRY LEMONWHAT A STRANGE NAME FOR A PUB

In Dublin in the 1950s there was a dog catcher and he had a lemon shaped head and yellowish skin and therefore the locals referred to him as the hairy lemon.

Situated on Johnsons Place, close to the Stephens Green Centre and Grafton Street, the Hairy Lemon provides a welcome atmosphere as you take a break from the city or settle in for a pleasant drink in good company.


AMY AUSTIN DRURY STREET

When I first saw this in 2021 I thought that it was an example of street art.

I have been advised by a friend that the name "Amy Austin" is a reference to a graffiti message, "I Love You So Much mural, by Austin [Texas] based musician Amy Cook.

The wine bar within a car park sits thirty guests and according my, already mentioned, friend it has a single large table in the middle with bar seating at the walls.


JACK NEALONS PUB ON CAPEL STREETDID NOT CEASE TRADING

I had not noticed but there were rain drops on my lens so some of the images contained multiple distortions.

The initial phases of the Heuston South Quarter (HSQ) complex were completed between 2005 and 2008 and resulted in six buildings with office, residential and retail accommodation. However, it includes a 3.63 acre development site with appropriate zoning and late in 2021 an application to build almost 400 apartments near the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin was lodged with the planning board.

According to the Office of Public Works (OPW) A 399 unit ‘built to rent’ apartment scheme reaching to 18 storeys in height will have “an unacceptable impact” on one of Ireland’s most important built heritage sites, Royal Hospital Kilmainham (RHK) and its gardens. The OPW informed An Bord Pleanala that the next phase of the Heuston South Quarter (HSQ) scheme “would have a significant detrimental impact on the architectural and historical setting of the Royal Hospital building”.


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