Harold's Cross Educate Together National School opened in September 2019 with 12 Junior Infant pupils. Each year they are growing and by 2026, they will cater for pupils from Junior Infants to Sixth Class. 


Harold's Cross Educate Together National School is located at the old Greyhound stadium in Harold's Cross. They are currently in temporary accommodation and they share their campus with Harold's Cross Educate Together Secondary School since September 2020. 


As an Educate Together school, they teach Ethical Education through their Learn Together Curriculum. The Learn Together Curriculum aims to provide pupils with a holistic, inclusive ethical education. Educate Together schools are child-centred, democratically run, equality based and co-educational. 


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A public consultation on the pedestrianisation of Capel Street earlier this year found that the vast majority of respondents said their experience of the street has improved since it was closed to vehicle traffic and I was one of those people.


My understanding is that Dublin City Council has engaged the services of BSLA [Bernard Seymour Landscape Architects]  to landscape the street and a public meetings have been arranged for next Tuesday and Wednesday.


Following a tender process, Bernard Seymour Landscape Architects have been invited to design an interim street improvement scheme to be installed before the summer. These designers are based on Mary’s Abbey, just off Capel Street and have extensive knowledge of the street.

The first stage in this process is to hold a workshop with councilors, local residents and local businesses to gain their views on what would work for the street. This is due to be held in the Capel Street area in mid-November and councilors, residents and businesses will be invited to participate. Following this initial workshop, a design will be advanced and further workshops will be held with the local community. This process will be driven by a collaborative approach.


A Shopfront Improvement Scheme is to be launched to encourage property owners and tenants to reinvigorate their business facades – painting, flower boxes, improved signage etc.


The junction of Ryders Row and Capel Street will undergo a greening enhancement in January 2023 to make this entrance into Capel Street more welcoming.


The City Council in partnership with the Dublin North Inner City Local Community Safety Partnership and DublinTown will be piloting a new pro social community warden scheme in the Capel Street and Wolfetone Park areas. The wardens will work with stakeholders including Gardai, City Council, Businesses and Residents on identifying areas for improvement, pop up events, advising shoppers/tourists on activities and places to see.


This year a small Christmas Tree has been installed on Capel Street towards the southern end of the street later this month.


CAPEL STREET TO BE LANDSCAPED

After more than 20 years Dublin City Council decided the repair the footpaths but I must give them credit resurfacing the road multiple times but unfortunately it was resurfaced three times in a month. They are also installing bollards which are needed because of anti-social activity relating to joy-riding or using the laneway as a ratrun.


Very few of you will have ever visited Henrietta Place but there is a lot of interest nearby but the laneway/road is ugly and is the subject of ongoing anti-social behaviour including illegal dumping. But to be fair things have improved over the last four or five years because the area is now undergoing the process of 'gentrification' and this is likely to accelerate with the introduction of the Luas Cross-City tram service and the ongoing development of the nearby University Campus.


I once took a walking tour of this area of Dublin and the tour guide told us that King's Inns had a D2 address even thought it was in D7 [not true]. His story was they had insisted on having a 'southside' number instead of D7 as was the case with Henrietta Street and Henrietta Place. I cannot find any evidence that this story was ever true and having checked a number postal addresses for buildings in the area I can say that Henrietta Place and Henrietta Street area in D1. However North King Street at one hen of Henrietta place is in Dublin 7. I should mention, for reasons that I will not discuss here that Phoenix Park on the north side of the river Liffey has a D8 postal code.




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Sherrard Street Upper was named after Thomas Sherrard, surveyor and clerk of the Wide Streets Commission, who laid out the terrace in the 1820s on land which had previously been part of the Gardiner Estate.


Sherrard, Thomas (c.1750–1837), surveyor and planner, was born to parents whose names are not known. In March 1789 he became the first salaried official of the commission; he was described as clerk or secretary, as well as surveyor, and in addition to administrative tasks, carried out a great deal of work on the ground. His responsibilities included surveying and mapmaking, laying out building plots, ascertaining levels, supervising work, and valuing new properties. He became a property developer and Sherrard Street was one of his private projects.



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AT DUBLINBIKES DOCKING STATION 75 ON JAMES STREET


Holly Pereira is a muralist & illustrator based in Dublin. Her hand-painted murals are colourful, fun and bold, and create bright and exuberant environments in which we are invited to play. Holly often gets inspiration from folk art and typography.




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I have seen the street spelled as James street and James's Street. For example Google Maps and other descriptions show monument as being on James Street while a local school is named CBS James's Street, even though it is on Basin Street.



The architect Francis Sandys was responsible for a number of public fountains in Dublin including this obelisk on James Street in Dublin.


I was told by a local historian/tourist guide that it was an old custom that funeral processions on passing the fountain would circle it three times before carrying on to the cemetery [I would take that with a pinch of salt as I have heard similar stories associated with other locations].


I have recently noticed that  people are complaining online and elsewhere about the lack of fountains in Dublin. In my travels around the city I have come across fountains and would describe them as many and varied. They range, in type and style, from elaborate Victorian masterpieces and modern sculptures to more modest, practical installations. The bad news is that many of the older fountains have fallen into disuse and lie, long forgotten and derelict, in overlooked corners of the city. I have also noted that the majority are dry.



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Because of all the protection it was close to impossible to photograph this religious statue.


This caught me by surprise and I cannot find any details online. I do not have any reason to believe that it is not a Marian Statue and I cannot understand why it is protected by such an ugly, and annoying, perspex case. I do not remember seeing  any other Marian Statue protected in such a manner and I have never seen one that has been vandalised in anyway. Maybe it needs protection from the elements as it is in an exposed position but many others are.


In 1953 Pope Pius ordered a Marian year for 1954, the first in Church history. It was called to commemorate the centenary of the definition of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary. The Marian year, which ran from December 1953 to December 1954, was filled with Marian initiatives, in the areas of Mariology, cultural events, and charity and social gatherings.


If you are not from Ireland you may be unaware of ‘Marian Statues’ and if you are younger than 35 or 40 you may also be unaware of them and even if you pass any of them on a daily basis you may not have given them much thought.


There are about 20 or 30 in Dublin alone and most of them are located on public land in what were working class areas back in the 1950s. One or two are located on private property with the statue at Broadstone Station being one example


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KN Circet, the contractor for the Francis Street Environmental Improvement Scheme, has advised of a road closure to Francis Street from Saturday 5th November to early Thursday 10th November to facilitate reconstruction and resurfacing of the carriageway. The works will see the full carriageway from Dean Swift Square/Swift’s Alley to Dean Street resurfaced. The street will be closed to traffic and parking will be suspended for the duration of the works.


This major element of the works will greatly improve the appearance of the street and tie in the work done to date. It will also allow new markings and controls on parking to be installed, and will mean all major works will now be completed on the southern three quarters of the street, other than localised work install new lighting columns and plant trees.


I am still testing my Sony FX30 camera and today I used a Sonnar T* FE 55mm F1.8 ZA. Vario-Sonnar Zeiss lens are optimised for the demands of Sony's high quality picture cameras using Carl Zeiss' expertise in creating both analog and digital lenses. It produces high quality, bright and sharp pictures, enabling sensitive and precise images.


Just about every setting on my camera was incorrect so ever image was way underexposed despite the fact the f/1.8 lens was fully open.


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08/11/2022

Dublin Docklands is an area of the city of Dublin, Ireland, on both sides of the River Liffey, roughly from Talbot Memorial Bridge eastwards to the 3Arena. It mainly falls within the city's D01 and D02  postal districts but includes some of the urban fringes of the D04 district on its southernmost side.


In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the docklands area was regenerated as an extension of the business hub of Dublin's International Financial Services Centre (IFSC). By 2008 the area had over 599 enterprises. While growth slowed considerably due to the post-2008 Irish economic downturn, since 2014, property values and development activity has made a recovery.


New infrastructure, built in the area in the 21st century, has included the Samuel Beckett Bridge and the LUAS Docklands extension. Venues, including the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre, the refurbished 3Arena and the Convention Centre Dublin are also in the area.

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A colourful bench has been added since my last visit, or maybe I failed to notice it back then,


John Blaquiere ( 1732 – 1812) was a distinguished British soldier, diplomat and politician of French Huguenot descent. He served as Chief Secretary for Ireland between 1772 and 1777. Blacquiere was instrumental in founding the Catholic Committee, with Lord Trimleston and others. Apparently he was known as “Queerblack” in satirical works of the time. The bridge on the Royal Canal at Phibsborough was named after him (Blacquiere Bridge).


Dublin City Council refer to this as the ‘Irish Volunteer Monument in Phibsboro’.


As this monument was not included on Google Maps I recently added a pin so that you can locate it if you ever nearby.


For many years I could not gain full access to this memorial because the gates were usually locked which I assumed was to protect against anti-social behaviour. The monument was vandalised in the 1970’s, and the Volunteer stood for many years with no rifle in his hand, until his restoration in 1991.  However it would now appear that Dublin City Council are adopting a different approach and are now leaving gates open twenty four hours per day and from what I seen so far indicates that vandalism has reduced … all that is needed now is a reduction in litter.


It was only recently that I noticed that this monument was originally build as a fountain but the water supply must have been removed as is often the case in Dublin.


The Irish Volunteer Monument commemorates members of the Dublin Brigade of the Irish Volunteers who fought and died during the Easter Rising (1916) and the War of Independence (1919-21). The monument depicts a soldier and below the soldier scenes from Irish mythology and ancient Irish history: the arrival of the Milesians (the first inhabitants of Ireland), Cuchulainn fighting at the ford and the death of King Brian Boru at Clontarf in 1014.


The limestone monument was created by Leo Broe (1899–1966) who himself had been a member of the Volunteers. It was unveiled on 19 February 1939.


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The stories of 1.5 million people are faithfully preserved at Ireland’s largest burial place. Visitors of all ages and identities are invited to explore and connect with their history through the stories of those buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.


Dublin Cemeteries Trust is a registered charity and the largest provider of funeral services in Ireland. The Trust operates five working cemeteries at Dardistown, Glasnevin, Goldenbridge, Newlands Cross and Palmerstown, and a visitor experience and historic archive at Glasnevin, Ireland’s National Cemetery. 


Services in burials, cremations and monument works, and in heritage, conservation and education, are delivered by a team of over 60 professionals.

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Michael John "Johnny" Giles (born 6 November 1940, in Ormond Square, Dublin, Ireland) is a former association footballer and manager best remembered for his time as a midfielder with Leeds United in the 1960s and 1970s. Since retirement he has served as "the Senior Analyst" on RTÉ Sport's coverage of association football.


Giles grew up in Ormond Square, a working-class area of inner-city Dublin, where he developed much of the skills that would aid him in becoming a professional footballer. He was encouraged to enter the game through his father Christy who played for Bohemians in the 1920s and managed Drumcondra during the 1940s.


Ormond Place, which I though was named Ormond Lane, is a laneway connecting Ormond Square to Arran Street and, via a narrow alleyway, to Ormond Quay.

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Widely considered one of Europe's elite institutions, Trinity is Ireland's most prestigious university, in part due to its long and distinguished history. 


Academically, it is divided into three faculties comprising 23 schools, offering degree and diploma courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The admission procedure is based exclusively on academic merit, with the college being particularly acclaimed in law, literature and humanities.


It also carries out extensive research in nanotechnology, information technology, immunology, mathematics, engineering, psychology, politics and English. 


Trinity College was originally established outside Dublin's city walls in the buildings of the outlawed Catholic Augustinian Priory of All Hallows. It was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and as a result was the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history.


While Catholics were admitted from the college's foundation, for a period graduation required the taking of an oath that was objectionable to them. In 1793 this requirement was removed, but certain restrictions on membership of the college remained, as professorships, fellowships and scholarships were reserved for Protestants. 


An 1873 Act of Parliament lifted these remaining restrictions. While Catholics were not formally banned from attending Trinity from that time, Ireland's Catholic hierarchy discouraged it. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in 1904.


The Library of Trinity College is a legal deposit library for Ireland and Great Britain, containing around 7 million printed volumes and significant quantities of manuscripts, including the Book of Kells, which arrived at the college in 1661 for safekeeping after the Cromwellian raids on religious institutions. The collection housed in the Long Room includes a rare copy of the 1916 Proclamation of the Irish Republic and a 15th-century wooden harp, which is the model for the current emblem of Ireland. The library receives more than 500,000 visitors per year, making it the most important in Ireland.

When I was young I went to school yards away from St. Stephen's Green and during my lunch break I would go to the park to feed the ducks (I did not like the sandwiches that my mother made for me but the ducks did). Seagulls are now dominant it's much more likely that gulls will get most of the bread thrown in the lake as they are much more aggressive than the other birds.


When I first saw these sculptures I thought that they had something do do with Halloween so I was described that they were made from metal.


Neopets is a virtual pet website. Users can own virtual pets and buy virtual items for them using one of two virtual currencies. One currency, called Neopoints, can be earned within the site, and the other, Neocash, can either be purchased with real-world money, or won by chance in-game



DUBLIN CITY COUNCIL PRESS RELEASE 4 OCTOBER 2022:



Dublin City Council is delighted to partner with The Form Foundation and Société to bring the NEOPETS exhibition, by New York artist Bunny Rogers, to the streets of Dublin. This special 8-week exhibition is part of a new, collaborative effort, led by The Form Foundation, to bring a selection of the most talked-about pieces of contemporary art to Ireland - introducing internationally recognised painting, sculpture and installation art to local audiences and making it accessible to everyone. 


The Bunny Rogers NEOPETS exhibition takes place on Dublin’s Kildare Street, Dublin 2 for 8 weeks only, from the 5th of October – 5th December 2022. Three of these Neopets (Techo Statue, Shoyru Statue and Chia Statue) will be on display as part of this exhibition.  


The artist, Bunny Rogers takes inspiration from online gaming and digital identities from her youth, to create brilliant, bold sculptures for this show-stopping NEOPETS exhibition. Rogers’ towering bronze sculptures bear resemblance to ornate European gargoyles, but are brilliantly modernised in Rogers’ whimsical and bold artistic style. 


Speaking about the installation, Lord Mayor of Dublin, Caroline Conroy said, “These NEOPETS sculptures by Bunny Rogers are not to be missed. I’m delighted to see them take up residence in Dublin as a playful animation. The exhibition is sure to be a great addition to our city’s conversation-starting public art scene.”


A major reference for Rogers is the world of online gaming and the malleable identities associated with role-playing and fantasy communities. This interest was not born out of purely conceptual or aesthetic considerations, but instead developed seamlessly from Rogers’ own fascination and involvement with these platforms in her youth. Her first forays into art can be traced to her experiments on the website Neopets.com: an immersive online universe popular in the early 2000s in which children created and tended to virtual pets. For Rogers, spending time on the internet as a child was equated with a freedom from isolation and her work thereby demonstrates an enchantment with online expressions of community. “My Neopets were real to me,” Rogers explains, “I wished that I could visit Neopia and didn’t understand why I couldn’t.” 


Rogers describes the process of logging into Neopets after school as “coming alive again.” The connection she felt with the game and its players alleviated the feelings of isolation and loneliness experienced away from the keyboard. “The participation in an online world made me aware of a bigger community,” Rogers says, “and (it) gave me hope that what I was doing wouldn’t always go unnoticed.”


By situating Rogers’ sculptures in the public domain, visitors can tap into an intimate space of memory, fantasy, and identity. The Neopets conceptually emphasise community, collaboration, cooperation, and the power of inventiveness and innovation. These sculptures will heighten observers’ awareness of these qualities, encompassing the ideals of living together as a community and making positive change in the world. 


-END-


Bunny Rogers (b. 1990, Houston) is a visual artist, poet, and performer based in New York. Her work has been exhibited internationally in solo exhibitions at venues including Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2020); Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz (2020); Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt (2019); Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles (2018); Whitney Museum of Art, New York (2017); De11 Lijnen (2016); and Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris (2015). She has participated in group exhibitions at Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2021); Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2019); New Museum, New York (2019); Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris (2018); OCAT Shanghai, Shanghai (2018); Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek (2017); LUMA Westbau, Zurich (2017); The Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2016); Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris (2016); Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-on-Hudson (2016); and Sandretto Re Rebaudengo Foundation, Turin (2015); The Jewish Museum, New York (2015); Luma Westbau, Zurich (2015); Queens Museum, New York (2015). She is the author of My Apologies Accepted (2014) and Cunny Poem Vol. 1 (2014).


Rogers has made a number of sculptural works inspired by the Neopets, which have become one of the most emblematic references in her artistic practice. Although previous works in this series were more modestly scaled, Rogers has recently begun to conceive of these works on a grand scale for public space. She created a towering Neopet sculpture for the 2021 edition of Art Basel Parcours. Enlarged to over three metres, these virtual creatures who left such an indelible mark on Rogers’ consciousness now assume an outsized physical form to meet us away from the keyboard. 



The Form Foundation is an organisation conceived to enrich Ireland’s public art offering. It has been established by Richard Bourke and Danielle Ryan. Danielle previously conceived of and founded Dublin’s national theatre academy, The Lir, partnering with Trinity College Dublin and RADA London. After years involved in the art industry, the couple has forged links with some of the world’s most influential galleries. The Form Foundation will collaborate with Irish institutions to bring a selection of the most talked-about pieces of contemporary art to Ireland. Supporting key projects in Dublin’s public galleries and museums, on its pavements and in its squares, it will introduce internationally recognised painting, sculpture and installation art to local audiences that is accessible to everyone.

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Location: Henrietta Street - Bolton Street area of Dublin


Today the new Sony A7RV was launched (Euro 4500) but I had already decided to go down a different path and purchase the Sony FX-30 which is a video-centric camera but unlike the A7RV it is not a full-frame camera and it does not have an Electronic View Finder. I must admit that I am a bit disappointed by the price of the A7RV.


The FX-30 arrived today but I discovered a problem in that Lightroom or Capture One could not process the RAW files, I have yet to use it as a video camera so cannot pass any comments.


It should be mentioned that ON1 and Luminar Neo both import the RAW files.


One thing that I needed to confirm that I could use my iPhone to Geo-Tag the images and I was  pleased to discover that were no issues.


The GP-VPT2BT wireless camera grip also works.

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"An impossible interlocking shape that can only exist in two dimensional space"


The Gordian Knot is an Ancient Greek legend of Phrygian Gordium associated with Alexander the Great who is said to have cut the knot in 333 BC. It is often used as a metaphor for an intractable problem (untying an impossibly tangled knot) solved easily by finding an approach to the problem that renders the perceived constraints of the problem moot ("cutting the Gordian knot").



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This work at 66-80 Chancery Street has been replaced since I first photographed it back in 2016.


Robert Mirolo is a freelance Illustrator, Animator and Designer working and living in Dublin. His work can be mostly seen on concert posters, album covers, digital publications, scraps of loose paper and within the pages of trendy magazines.


COFFEE PALS BY ROBERT MIROLO

This was one of my first sessions with my new, but very old, Canon 5D MkIII. My local dealer contacted me indicating that a customer had won a 5D body when it was launched back in 2012 but had put in on shelf and had forgotten about it. The body was available to me a good price if I was interested. I asked to borrow the camera for a day or two. As I had a number of Canon EF lenses I was more than interested providing I could get a suitable GPS unit. 


The GPS unit arrived and worked very well but it was not available for this session. However, I no longer have the funds to allow the purchase of the Sony A7RV which is due to be launched on the 26 October 2022. But I have the much less expensive FX3 cine-centric camera on order.


The Canon EOS 5D Mark III is a professional-grade 22.3 megapixels full-frame digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera made by Canon. Succeeding the EOS 5D Mark II, the Mark III was announced on 2 March 2012. This date coincided with the 25th anniversary of the announcement of the first camera in the EOS line, the EOS 650, and was also Canon's 75th anniversary. The Mark III went on sale later in March with a retail price of $3,499 in the US, £2999 in the UK, and €3569 in the Eurozone. On 25 August 2016, Canon announced the camera's successor, the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV.


Before I switched to Sony I had the original 5D which was my favourite DSLR.




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