06/01/2024

RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 001
RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 002
RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 003
RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 004
RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 005
RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 006
RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 007
RENDEZVOUS BY BOB QUINN 008

TODAY I HAD A RENDEZVOUS WITHIN  THE UCD UNIVERSITY CAMPUS [6 JANUARY WHICH IS WOMEN'S CHRISTMAS OR LITTLE CHRISTMAS HERE IN IRELAND]


This sculpture is Rendezvous and it is by Bob Quinn. Quinn (b.1948, Britain) had a successful career as a graphic designer. Since 2002 he is a full time figurative sculptor working mainly in bronze. 


As it was Women's Christmas I decided to visit my mother who will be 104 in May. This date two years ago she decided to move to a Nursing Home and that caught everyone by surprise but the family organised it so that at least one person a day would visit her. This year it was difficult to maintain the schedule as not many family members remained in Dublin for Christmas. The nursing home is effectively within the University Campus and normally I would bring my mother for a walk through parts of the campus but today she was not interested in going outside as it was too cold. The sunlight was beautiful but it was very cold.


The celebration of the feast of the Epiphany in Ireland, January 6th is marked by Nollaig na mBan or Women's Little Christmas. On this day it is the tradition in Ireland for the women to get together and enjoy their own Christmas, while the men folk stay at home and handle all the chores. It is also common for children to buy their mothers and grandmothers presents on this day, though this custom is gradually being overtaken by Mothers Day.


Although Nollaig na mBan is slowly dying out in many parts of Ireland, in Co. Cork on the South West coast, the tradition is still very strong. Many bars and restaurants in Cork City report a near 100% female clientele on this day, as the Corkonian women meet up with girl friends, sisters, aunts and mothers to celebrate their own little Christmas with Nollaig na mBan.

21/10/2023

BOANN IS AN AMAZING MURAL BY LULA GOCE [BUT WHAT ABOUT THE CHEMTRAILS?]  001
BOANN IS AN AMAZING MURAL BY LULA GOCE [BUT WHAT ABOUT THE CHEMTRAILS?]  002
BOANN IS AN AMAZING MURAL BY LULA GOCE [BUT WHAT ABOUT THE CHEMTRAILS?]  003

BOANN IS AN AMAZING MURAL BY LULA GOCE [BUT WHAT ABOUT THE CHEMTRAILS?]


Boann was the goddess who was said to have created the river Boyne (which is named after her) when she defied her husband to approach the sacred and mystical Nechtain's Well.


Lula Goce, born in Galicia, Spain, is fascinated by the dialogue that occurs between passers-by and residents, and the impact that murals/street art have on an area.



When I visited Drogheda last week there was a large number of aircraft movements to be seen in the very blue sky and when I was attempting to photograph this large mural I was approached by two people who were convinced that I was photographing contrails which they referred to as chemtrails and unfortunately it was difficult to get away from them. I encounter this on a regular basis and in general it does not bother me but today I could not concentrate on photographing the immediate area and I will need to return at a later date.


The chemtrail conspiracy theory is the belief that long-lasting condensation trails left in the sky by high-flying aircraft are actually "chemtrails" consisting of chemical or biological agents, sprayed for nefarious purposes undisclosed to the general public. Believers in this conspiracy theory say that while normal contrails dissipate relatively quickly, contrails that linger must contain additional substances. Those who subscribe to the theory speculate that the purpose of the chemical release may be solar radiation management, weather modification, psychological manipulation, human population control, biological or chemical warfare, or testing of biological or chemical agents on a population, and that the trails are causing respiratory illnesses and other health problems.


The term chemtrail blends the words chemical and trail, just as contrail blends condensation and trail.




DRAWDA - a curated multidisciplinary public arts programme, launched in Drogheda between November 2021, and April 2022, culminating in an Urban Art Trail throughout Drogheda that focuses on key figures and moments from Ireland's mythological past.

14/08/2023

CONFLUENCE BY JARLATH DALY [A SCULPTURE AT THE SALMON LEAP IN LEIXLIP]  001
CONFLUENCE BY JARLATH DALY [A SCULPTURE AT THE SALMON LEAP IN LEIXLIP]  002
CONFLUENCE BY JARLATH DALY [A SCULPTURE AT THE SALMON LEAP IN LEIXLIP]  003
CONFLUENCE BY JARLATH DALY [A SCULPTURE AT THE SALMON LEAP IN LEIXLIP]  004

A work inspired by the merging of the River Liffey (represented by the necklace-wearing female) with the Rye Water (the sword-wearing male warrior) at The Salmon Leap, Leixlip, Co Kildare.


At Leixlip, or Salmon Leap as it used to be called, the Liffey tumbled down two spectacular water falls. These waterfalls formed a natural obstacle for salmon as they swam upstream to spawn and so it was possible to see the salmon leaping from the water to get further upstream.


The River Rye or Ryewater is a tributary of the River Liffey. It rises in County Meath, flowing south-east for 19 miles. Although the river has been the subject of arterial drainage schemes, it is generally fast flowing over a stoney bottom. The Rye's major tributary is the Lyreen.


The Rye runs north of Kilcock and Maynooth. Maynooth Castle is built between the Lyreen and its tributary the Joan Slade River. The Lyreen and Rye meet to the east of Maynooth and flow on through the estate of Carton House. In the estate, the river was widened to form an ornamental lake within the Georgian parklands, further enhanced by an ornamental bridge and boathouse.


The river then flows behind Intel Ireland where Intel have been monitoring the water quality since 1989.


Near Louisa Bridge in Leixlip the waters from the Leixlip Spa flow into Rye River. There is also an overflow from the canal. The Rye then flows under the Royal Canal, which is carried in the Leixlip aqueduct almost 100 feet (30m) above. The aqueduct is in fact an earth embankment, which took six years to build in the 1790s.


The Rye then descends into the heart of Leixlip. Here the river was harnessed by mills. In 1758, the site was used as a linen printing mill. Later the Rye Vale distillery was built, producing more than 20,000 gallons of whiskey annually in 1837. The distillery finally closed for good in the 1890s and the distillery has since been converted into apartments. The Rye then flows under the Rye Bridge to the confluence with the Liffey near the existing Boat House of Leixlip demesne.

18/07/2023

CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 001
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 002
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 003
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 004
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 005
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 006
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 007
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 008
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 009
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 010
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 011
CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN 012

CHAC MOOL BY SEBASTIAN [NEAR THE LINCOLN GATE ENTRANCE TO TRINITY COLLEGE]


I must admit that I like this ... well I like anything that is painted blue. Formally unveiled by Provost Patrick Prendergast and H.E. Ambassador Carlos García de Alba in the presence of the artist on the 18th of September 2015 to mark 40 years of Mexican-Irish Diplomatic Relations


Enrique Carbajal González was born in Chihuahua, Northern Mexico, shortly after the end of the Second World War. The artist adopted the pseudonym ‘Sebastián’ after the painting of the martyred Saint Sebastian by Sandro Botticelli. He is best known for his monumental public sculptures, created using steel or concrete, which can now be seen throughout the world. There are currently four of these sculptures in Ireland, all of which have been generously donated by the artist.


The term Chac Mool refers to a style of ancient Mesoamerican sculpture found in temples and sacred sites throughout Central Mexico. Appearing as a vehicle between man and the gods, it traditionally depicts a reclining figure with its legs bent upwards, resting on its elbows and with its face looking out over its shoulder. This specific type of sculpture was discovered in the 19th century by an archaeologist who named it after the greatest Mayan warrior, Chac Mool. As the artist explains, the colour blue was traditionally used to signify members of the priesthood in ancient frescoes and manuscripts. Although there has been little agreement by historians and anthropologists as to the function or meaning of these ancient sculptures, one interpretation is that they were created to commemorate fallen warriors and allow others to offer gifts to the gods in their memory.


Here on campus, Sebastián’s Chac Mool reinforces a powerful sculptural lineage, associating itself most particularly with Henry Moore’s work entitled Reclining Connected Forms (1969). Moore stated that, from an early stage, he was captivated by Mexican sculpture, particularly by the Chac Mool figure, leading him in 1929 to carve his own Chac Mool in Hornton stone which he later described as one of the key works of his career, from which his renowned reclining figures developed. Sebastián’s turquoise Chac Mool is a vital, contemporary invitation to engage with figure, form, colour and sculpted space within a rich visual arts ancestry.


17/07/2023

RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 001
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 002
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 003
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 004
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 005
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 006
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 007
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 008
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 009
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 010
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 012
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 013
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 014
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 015
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 016
RECLINING AND CONNECTED FORMS 017

Within a week I had the opportunity to photograph two sculptures by Henry Moore. Today I visited Trinity College in Dublin City centre and photographed Reclining And Connected Forms which is a 1969 bronze sculpture Forms. For some strange reason this appears to be ignored by visitors and tourists who photograph everything except this amazing and complex sculpture.


Years ago Henry Moore provided , on loan, a sculpture which became known as 'The King And Queen' and it was located on the Library forecourt but as he was not happy about the location he decided that it should be returned. He had not been happy with the location because he felt that there was a conflict with the forecourt lanterns and because there was not enough sunlight on the north facing forecourt.


The university worked persistently to find a replacement for the King and Queen and eventually proposed the work by Pomodoro which is now permanently installed on the forecourt and which appears to have been made for it. A perfect outcome.


Eventually Trinity obtained another work by Henry Moore, for which a location in Library Square was agreed and where it has remained.


Henry Spencer Moore OM CH FBA (30 July 1898 – 31 August 1986) was an English artist. He is best known for his semi-abstract monumental bronze sculptures which are located around the world as public works of art. As well as sculpture, Moore produced many drawings, including a series depicting Londoners sheltering from the Blitz during the Second World War, along with other graphic works on paper.


His forms are usually abstractions of the human figure, typically depicting mother-and-child or reclining figures. Moore's works are usually suggestive of the female body, apart from a phase in the 1950s when he sculpted family groups. His forms are generally pierced or contain hollow spaces. Many interpreters liken the undulating form of his reclining figures to the landscape and hills of his Yorkshire birthplace.


Moore became well known through his carved marble and larger-scale abstract cast bronze sculptures, and was instrumental in introducing a particular form of modernism to the United Kingdom. His ability in later life to fulfil large-scale commissions made him exceptionally wealthy. Despite this, he lived frugally; most of the money he earned went towards endowing the Henry Moore Foundation, which continues to support education and promotion of the arts.

VIEW OUR PRIVACY POLICY