17/06/2023

ANOTHER BLUE GENERIC METAL SCULPTURE IN CORK 001
ANOTHER BLUE GENERIC METAL SCULPTURE IN CORK 002

ANOTHER BLUE GENERIC METAL SCULPTURE IN CORK [BY JOHN BURKE]


I was at a distance when I noticed this blue sculpture so the photographs are not detailed. I came across the sculpture by accident as I was trying to find my way to St. Finbarr's Cemetery. At the time there was too much traffic at the Wilton Roundabout so I decided that it would be better to return later in order to photograph the sculpture but as it began to rain during my visit to the cemetery  I decided to get the 216 bus back to the city centre. Of course, the rain ceased the minute I boarded the bus. Unfortunately because of weather conditions I never got to revisit the sculpture.


If you refer to "Cork In 50 Artworks" you will discover that No 29 is John Burke's sculpture at Wilton Roundabout.


The piece – 25 ft high and eight tons in weight - was commissioned by local businessmen Clayton Love and Séamus Gallagher to inaugurate the Cork 800 celebrations the following year.


According to a local newspaper the untitled sculpture was mistaken by many as a location marker for airplanes flying into Cork Airport.


Born in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, in 1946, John Burke studied at the Crawford School of Art in Cork, and in London with Brian Kneal.


He has shown sculptures in all the major Irish group exhibitions, as well as international shows like Artists 77, New York (1977); 18 European Sculptors, Munich (1978); Sculpture Européenne, Brussels (1979); A Sense of Ireland, London (1980); and C.A.N., Cork (1985), where he won the sculptor prize. He has held solo shows at Trinity College, Dublin; the Ulster Museum, Belfast; the David Hendriks Gallery, Dublin; and an open-air show in Cork city.


His outdoor works include the abstract red steel sculpture at the Bank of Ireland building on Baggot Street, Dublin. I really like the one on Baggot Street.


17/06/2023

THEIR GENERIC RED METAL SCULPTURE IS BLUE 001
THEIR GENERIC RED METAL SCULPTURE IS BLUE 002
THEIR GENERIC RED METAL SCULPTURE IS BLUE 003
THEIR GENERIC RED METAL SCULPTURE IS BLUE 004
THEIR GENERIC RED METAL SCULPTURE IS BLUE 005

THEY ARE DIFFERENT IN BLACKROCK ON THE LEE [THEIR GENERIC RED METAL SCULPTURE IS BLUE]



I decided to reprocess this and other photographs from my 2022 visit to Cork using three AI apps that I am currently beta testing.


Every time I have seen this there have been signs of anti-social activity [assuming that graffiti is always anti-social] and that is not something that I would associate with Blackrock in Cork.


I searched online for information and unfortunately all links found were to photographs by myself or some comments that I have made about what are often referred to as red metal yokes. I should mention that in May 2022 I also came across a similar installation by John Burke at the Wilton Roundabout and it was also blue.


This type of generic sculpture is usually red and it came as a surprise to discover two in Cork that are blue especially as the people of Cork appear to have adopted red as their defining colour. 


Note: In 1913 Cork wore blue jerseys with a large yellow "C" in front. In a 1919 raid in by British troops on the county board rooms in Cook Street, the jerseys were taken. So, Cork used the jerseys of the St Finbarr's Total Abstinence Hall team, which were dark red/maroon, and Cork have worn red ever since. An apocryphal story claims that the colours derive from St Anne's Church, Shandon, which has walls of red sandstone and white limestone.


Note: In Ireland it is often the case that the word 'yoke' doesn't have anything to do with eggs. Rather, it is another way of saying thing. So if someone in Ireland sees an object that they've never seen before, they will commonly be heard to ask, What's that yoke there?  Example: Can you pass me that yoke you use to control the TV.



17/06/2023

A RED METAL YOKE 001
A RED METAL YOKE 002
A RED METAL YOKE 003
A RED METAL YOKE 004
A RED METAL YOKE 005
A RED METAL YOKE 006

EXAMPLE OF RED METAL SCULPTURE ON THE CORK UNIVERSITY CAMPUS [A RED METAL YOKE]


Is it my imagination or is there a certain ‘sameness’ about much college campus sculptures.


About twenty years ago I heard a young child refer to a red metal sculpture as a "red metal yoke" and I decided to use the term myself. In Irish slang, the word 'yoke' doesn't have anything to do with eggs. Instead, it's another way of saying 'thing'. So if someone in Ireland sees an object that they've never seen before, they might ask, 'What's that yoke there? 


In 2015 I spent three days in Cork and it rained most of the time and I had to abandon my plans to photograph the University campus because the rain got so heavy that I ended up photographing raindrops. 


In 2016 I decided to spend five days in the city assuming that that it was unlikely that it would rain for five days without stop. As you may have guessed, it did rain every day but as there were many extended dry spells the weather did not impact on my photography. I did, however,  have a problem with dust on my sensor. I discovered that there was a large object attached to the sensor and I was unable to remove it but it only obvious under certain conditions. Further investigation leads me to believe that the debris was there since my 2016 visit to Belfast.


Previous years I walked from location I walked from location but 2016 was the year that I began to use the bus service which I found to be good. I got a lot advice from the bus drivers as to what I should photograph and how best to get to the locations in question.


My most recent visit was May 2023 and it did rain every day but there were many extended periods of really pleasant weather which allowed my to explore and photograph parts of the city that I had never visited before.



29/05/2023

CUT OUT PEOPLE 001
CUT OUT PEOPLE 002
CUT OUT PEOPLE 003
CUT OUT PEOPLE 004

DANNY MacCARTHY'S CUT OUT PEOPLE [THIS SCULPTURE CAN BE FOUND IN BLACKROCK PARK]


It has taken me many months to find any information relating to this metal sculpture but a few months ago I discovered that it is  "Cut Out People' by Dan MacCarthy.


Danny McCarthy is a founding director of the National Sculpture Factory and of Triskel Arts Centre and is a director the Sirius Arts Centre, Cobh. He has also curated numerous exhibitions and projects including Sound Out (with David Toop), Bend It Like Beckett, Sonic Vigil, Just Listen plus many more.




19/05/2023

RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE 001
RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE 002
RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE 003
RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE 004
RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE 005
RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE 006

RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE BY GERALDINE CREEDON [AT RORY GALLAGHER PLACE IN CORK]


In 1997 Paul Street Plaza was renamed as Rory Gallagher Place and a memorial sculpture was unveiled. The unique bronze sculpture was created by Cork artist Geraldine Creedon in honour of Rory Gallagher, at the request of Cork Corporation and Rory's family. The bronze sculpture takes the form of a guitar on one side, while the other side consists of intertwined lyrics from Rory's Jinx album.


Rory Gallagher was an Irish blues-rock multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and bandleader. Born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, and raised in Cork, Gallagher recorded solo albums throughout the 1970s and 1980s, after forming the band Taste during the late 1960s. He was a talented guitarist known for his charismatic performances and dedication to his craft. Gallagher's albums have sold in excess of 30 million copies worldwide.Gallagher received a liver transplant in 1995, but died of complications later that year in London at the age of 47.



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