22/02/2024

HAVE YOU BEEN A BOLD BOY [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ON NORTH BRUNSWICK STREET] 001
HAVE YOU BEEN A BOLD BOY [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ON NORTH BRUNSWICK STREET] 002
HAVE YOU BEEN A BOLD BOY [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ON NORTH BRUNSWICK STREET] 003

HAVE YOU BEEN A BOLD BOY [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ON NORTH BRUNSWICK STREET]


I once had a red setter who got very upset if you said to him "have you been a bold boy". Note:  in other English speaking countries, most notably England, being bold is a good thing. But in Ireland, typically, the word is applied to misbehaving children.


Dublin Canvas is an amazing public art project that brings much needed colour and creativity to the streets of Dublin, Ireland. It transforms ordinary electrical boxes into vibrant works of art, creating a more interesting and engaging environment for everyone. 

11/02/2024

PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART TRIBUTE TO FRANCIS BACON 001
PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART TRIBUTE TO FRANCIS BACON 002

BAGGOT STREET WAS HOME TO SOME INTERESTING PEOPLE [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART TRIBUTE TO FRANCIS BACON]


Francis Bacon was an Irish-born British figurative painter known for his raw, unsettling imagery. Focusing on the human form, his subjects included crucifixions, portraits of popes, self-portraits, and portraits of close friends, with abstracted figures sometimes isolated in geometrical structures


Baggot street runs from Merrion Row (near St. Stephen's Green) to the northwestern end of Pembroke Road. It crosses the Grand Canal near Haddington Road. It is divided into two sections:


Lower Baggot Street  - between Merrion Row and the Grand Canal. It was called Gallows Road in the 18th century.

Upper Baggot Street  - south of the Grand Canal until the junction with Eastmoreland Place, where it continues as Pembroke Road.

Lower Baggot Street is distinguished by Georgian architecture, while Upper Baggot Street has mainly Victorian architecture with a few buildings of 20th century vintage. The Royal City of Dublin Hospital, Baggot Street, opened in 1834, is on the east side of Upper Baggot Street, just south of the junction with Haddington Road. Cook's Map of 1836 shows the north side of Upper Baggot Street and Pembroke Road almost entirely built on.


The Sheares Brothers, members of the Society of United Irishmen, who died in the 1798 rebellion, lived at no. 128.

In 1830, Thomas Davis, the revolutionary Irish writer who was the chief organiser and poet of the Young Ireland movement, lived at 67 Lower Baggot Street.


Catherine McAuley, a nun, founded the Sisters of Mercy order in 1831 and built what is now the Mercy International Centre on Lower Baggot Street where she later died in 1841.


In 1909, Francis Bacon was born at 63 Lower Baggot Street.


The poet Patrick Kavanagh frequented Baggot Street and regarded it as his favourite place in Dublin. In his poem "If ever you go to Dublin Town" Kavanagh addresses Dubliners 100 years after his own time and tells them to "Inquire for me in Baggot Street/And what I was like to know".


Singer-songwriter Sinéad O'Connor has a property here. 

28/01/2024

GRA BY EOIN BARRY [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART ON NORTH WALL QUAY IN DUBLIN DOCKLANDS]  001
GRA BY EOIN BARRY [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART ON NORTH WALL QUAY IN DUBLIN DOCKLANDS]  002

FUNFAIR CARNIVAL BOX [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART]


According to the label attached to the actual cabinet this is "Love Mor" by Eoin Barry but it is described by Dublin Canvas  as 'Gra' by Eoin Barry. I photographed another box by the same artist on Canal Road in Ranelagh on the other side of the city and it similar and is titled "Love Mor"


Eoin Barry is an artist living and working in Limerick City. He graduated from Limerick School of Art and Design in 2013 with a Masters in Social Practice and the Creative Environment. During which he began a project entitled Cathair Gra an urban art initiative devised to combat the dominance of commercial language in urban space. One medium which he uses to achieve this is street art, by integrating art into the urban landscape Eoin one day hopes to create a visual utopia free from persuasion and manipulation derived from capitalist ideology. 


27/01/2024

FUNFAIR CARNIVAL BOX [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART]

FUNFAIR CARNIVAL BOX [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART]


Unfortunately this was interfered with. When I photographed it back in 2016 I did not realise that it was a representation of a claw-machine.


Modern claw machines are upright cabinets with glass boxes that are lit from the inside and have a joystick-controlled claw at the top, which is coin-operated and positioned over a pile of prizes, dropped into the pile, and picked up to unload the prize or lack thereof [most frequently] into a chute.

 

26/01/2024

THE GIRLS ARE BACK IN TOWN 001
THE GIRLS ARE BACK IN TOWN 002
THE GIRLS ARE BACK IN TOWN 003
THE GIRLS ARE BACK IN TOWN 004
THE GIRLS ARE BACK IN TOWN 005

THE GIRLS ARE BACK IN TOWN BY ARIYANA AHMAD [PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART ON CUSTOM HOUSE QUAY]


Unfortunately I know little about the artist responsible for this example of Paint-A-Box street art on Custom House Quay.


Custom House Quay is highly significant as the setting for James Gandon's neoclassical Custom House, one of the city's grandest buildings, built to reflect the its position as a buoyant centre of eighteenth-century trade and commerce. 


Casey (2005) describes the quay, in the context of the Custom House, as 'the single most important collection point in the Irish Revenue system'. It is the most easterly of a linear arrangement of quays lining both sides of the Liffey, and retains something of its maritime flavour, located in close proximity to the original warehouses, dock basins and industrial infrastructure than remain in the area. Together, the quays are reminders of the economic and maritime development of Dublin city as Ireland's principal port. 

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