27/11/2023

ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  001
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  002
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  003
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  004
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  005
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  006
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  007
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  008
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  009
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  010
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  011
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  012
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  013
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  016
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  017
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  018
ALONG THE SOUTH QUAYS IN NOVEMBER [THE MILLENNIUM BRIDGE TO O'CONNELL STREET BRIDGE]  019



I walked along Wellington Quay and Aston Quay.


The Dublin quays refers to the two roadways and quays that run along the north and south banks of the River Liffey in Dublin, Ireland. The stretches of the two continuous streets have several different names. However, all but two of the names (Bachelors Walk and Usher's Island) share the same "quay" designation. The quays have played an important part in Dublin's history.


Much of the southern roadway and about half of the northern roadway is part of the R148 road, while the other half of the northern roadway is part of the R801 road.


The name designations of the south roadway are (from west to east): Victoria Quay, Usher's Island, Usher's Quay, Merchant's Quay, Wood Quay, Essex Quay, Wellington Quay, Crampton Quay, Aston Quay, Burgh Quay, George's Quay, City Quay, Sir John Rogerson's Quay and Britain Quay.

09/11/2023

WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  001
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  002
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  003
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  004
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  005
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  006
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  007
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  008
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  009
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  010
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  011
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  012
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  013
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  014
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  015
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  016
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  017
WERBURGH STREET AND BRIDE STREET [BETWEEN ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL AND CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL]  018


Werburgh Street is a street in the medieval area of Dublin, Ireland named for St. Werburgh's Church.


The street was originally St Werburgh Street, named after St. Werburgh's Church, with the street first appearing on maps in 1257. Werburgh Street Theatre was the first purpose-built theatre built in Ireland.


In 1280 Sir Robert Bagod bought a stone dwelling house near Werburgh Street from the Hyntenberghs, a prominent Dublin family. In the fifteenth century, Roger Sutton had a house on the Street. It passed on his death to his son William Sutton, Attorney-General for Ireland.


The southern end of the street was the location of one of the gateways in the city's walls, known as St Werburgh's Gate or Pole Gate. In the 1600s, the southern end was also the location of the Main Guard of the city. Their station on the street is denoted by Gun Alley nearby, which has since been demolished.


The earliest iteration of the prison, the Four Courts Marshalsea, was also located on Werburgh Street in an area previously known as Shoemaker's Street from 1580 until the 18th century.


In 1637, perhaps as early as 1634. John Ogilby (at the time, Master of the Revels for Ireland and member of the household of Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford, the Lord Deputy of Ireland) founded Ireland's first theatre, the Werburgh Street Theatre.


There was a square on the western side of the street known as Darby Square, where the Liberty Rangers performed military practice in the run-up to the 1798 rebellion.


In 1785, a portion of the pavement collapsed, revealing a cave 40 feet deep filled with coffins and bones. It was thought to be the remains of the old cemetery of St Martin's Church.


Jonathan Swift was born in Hoey's Court, which was off Werburgh Street. One of the last surviving cagework, timber and plaster houses in Dublin was on the corner of Werburgh and Castle Street before it was demolished in 1813.



Bride Street runs from Werburgh Street at the north to New Bride Street at the south. It runs parallel to Patrick Street.


Bride Street appears in a 1465 map of Dublin as "Synt Bryd stret". The St Bride's Church for which the street is named is first mentioned in 1178. This church was demolished in the late 1800s to make way for the Iveagh Trust housing scheme.[3] Adelaide Hospital was originally located at 42 Bride Street until 1846.


Many of the older buildings on Bride Street were demolished during the 1960s to widen the road for increased vehicular traffic.[6] Before this, it was one of the streets illustrated by Flora Mitchell for her book Vanishing Dublin. It depicts the store owned by a noted Dublin character, Johnny Foxes.


Molyneux House sits on the corner of Bride Street and Peter Street. Molyneux House is a converted church and modern office extension that was once the offices of the architect Sam Stephenson who also designed the conversion and extension in 1973.[8] It is built on the site of the old Bird Market, and Stephenson provided the traders with a walled side garden from which they continued to trade.


There is a plaque to John Field on the corner of Bride Street and Golden Lane. Some of the series of plaques created by artist Chris Reid are on Bride Street, with quotes from local residents of the area.

05/11/2023

ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 001
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 002
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 003
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 004
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 005
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 006
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 007
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 008
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 009
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 010
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 011
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 012
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 013
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 014
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 015
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 016
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 017
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 018
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 019
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 020
ACCESS TO SOME WOODLAND SECTIONS NOW RESTRICTED 021


This was my first session in November and the weather was beautiful so I walked from the city centre to Bushy Park only to discover that access to the wooded part that I planned to explore is restricted.


In 2019, a bat survey was carried out in Bushy Park as part of the Dodder Greenway project. This survey identified five Daubenton's bat roosts in trees in the woodland. Both bats and their roosts are protected under national and EU legislation and it is an offence to disturb or interfere with them without a licence. In Phase I, tree works were scheduled beside three of these bat roosts and DCC Parks, Landscape and Biodiversity services applied for a Derogation Licence from National Park and Wildlife Services (NPWS) to carry out work close to bat roosts. NPWS have recommended a series of further bat surveys between April to October 2023 (inclusive) before works can commence.


Bushy Park Woodland is also the home to a large number of herons which nest every year in the woodland. Parks have appointed a qualified ecologist to monitor the tree works close to the heronry as it is legally possible to carry out tree works during bird nesting season if no nests are disturbed and all works are monitored by an ecologist. This year heron eggs hatched earlier than usual with a second clutch laid. This has resulted in tree works beside the heronry being delayed for the protection of the heron chicks.


DCC Parks have worked with the NPWS to design a series of surveys and monitoring programme of both bats and heron nests in order to better understand the significance of this location in a wider context. These surveys are ongoing and will continue, in the instance of the bats until mid-Autumn. Unfortunately since the start of the year there have been a number of tree failures and large branches dropped in the woodland. With this in mind and in order to protect the public, a section of the main footpath in the woodland will be closed from June 2023 until the tree work is completed.


To promote the long term health of the woodland, the future management of the woodland will involve keeping some areas fenced off on a more permanent basis in order to allow natural re-generation and new planting establish successfully. There will also be a programme of Laurel and Japanese Knotweed removal which again may require sections of woodland to be closed for a period. These works will be flagged in advance. 


In future Parks will close the woodland in its entirety in response to weather warnings issued by the Met Office in future, yellow up. A woodland management plan is currently being prepared and will explain these initiatives in more detail.


The presence of both the bat and heron populations within the woodland in Bushy Park marks it out as a significant location for biodiversity in Dublin City. Parks apologise for the inconvenience caused by closing the woodland paths but must take necessary precautions to ensure the health and safety of the public. Along with its history and cultural significance it is worth doing all we can to protect the woodland for future generations to enjoy.

05/11/2023


I recorded a few videos today and most of them were unusable at the SD card was not fast enough. This particular video was in slow motion so I decided to experiment with it and eventually converted it to a cartoon and don't worry - this is not something that I plan to do on a regular basis.


Glasson Court Park is a 2.9-acre park located in the Windy Arbour area of Dundrum, Dublin. It is situated on the banks of the River Slang, a tributary of the River Dodder. According to some accounts the park is named after Glasson Court, a housing estate that was built on the site in the 1960s. However it is more likely that Glasson Court Park is named after the local village of Windy Arbour, which was historically called Glassons. The name Glassons is derived from the Irish word , meaning "the green land."


The name Windy Arbour or Sandy Arbour was later applied to the area, referring to a landing-point on the River Slang. A starch mill was formerly located there. “Arbour” once had the meaning “grass plot, lawn, garden”; it is possible that the name was intended as a direct translation of glasáin. So, the name Glasson Court Park is likely a reference to both the historical name of the area and the local village.

02/11/2023

LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 001
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 002
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 003
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 004
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 005
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 006
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 007
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 008
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 009
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 010
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 011
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 012
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 013
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 014
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 015
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 016
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 017
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 018
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 019
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 020
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 021
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 022
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 023
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 024
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 025
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 026
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 027
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 028
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 029
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 030
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 031
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 032
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 033
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 034
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 035
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 036
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 037
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 038
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 039
LIFFEY VALLEY SHOPPING CENTRE [13 AUGUST 2023] 040


I started out with the intention of visiting Chapelizod today and got the the G2 bus instead of the 26. I knew that the 26 served Chapelizod on it way to Liffey Valley but I missed the 26 by about two minutes and the G2 which goes to Liffey Valley arrived a few minutes later so I boarded it. Much to my surprise it took a very long time to get to Liffey Valley and did not pass through Chapelizod. I was even more surprised to discover that there was a major transport hub at the shopping centre.


Liffey Valley Shopping Centre is a shopping centre located in Dublin 22, Ireland which Comprises 80 stores and 20 Restaurants. The centre opened on 14 October 1998 and is located near the junction of the M50 motorway and N4 road closely surrounded by Lucan to the west, Palmerstown Village to the east and Clondalkin to the south. The centre was a scaled-down replacement for a much larger complex once mooted for the site, known as Quarryvale, the development of which was highly controversial. After over a decade without major development, the centre was extended in 2016.


For two decades an actual "town centre" had been planned in a central location to serve the Lucan, Clondalkin and Palmerstown areas. But Liffey Valley was built to the northeastern extremity of the area it was originally planned to serve. This meant, as noted by Jerry Barnes, chairman of the Royal Town Planning Institute, that the residents of Lucan, Clondalkin and Palmerstown "have been left for 20 years without an appropriately centrally located town centre which is easily accessible to all. This has very serious long-term implications for thousands of people".


Thirty Dublin councillors were investigated by the Mahon Tribunal over allegations about accepting bribes relating to the rezoning of land in Quarryvale. 


VIEW PRIVACY POLICY