15/10/2023

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Glasson Court Park is a 2.9-acre park located in the Windy Arbour area of Dundrum, Dublin. It is situated on the banks of the River Slang, a tributary of the River Dodder. According to some accounts the park is named after Glasson Court, a housing estate that was built on the site in the 1960s. However it is more likely that Glasson Court Park is named after the local village of Windy Arbour, which was historically called Glassons. The name Glassons is derived from the Irish word , meaning "the green land."


The name Windy Arbour or Sandy Arbour was later applied to the area, referring to a landing-point on the River Slang. A starch mill was formerly located there. “Arbour” once had the meaning “grass plot, lawn, garden”; it is possible that the name was intended as a direct translation of glasáin. So, the name Glasson Court Park is likely a reference to both the historical name of the area and the local village.


14/10/2023

A SMALL BUT POPULAR PUBLIC PARK [IN HAROLD'S CROSS] 001
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Here in Dublin there is a large selection of excellent and well maintained public parks.


This 1.25 hectare (3 acres) park was developed in 1894 by the Rathmines / Rathgar Commissioners and officially opened on May 1st 1894. The site of the park was used as commonage from medieval times. Designed by William Sheppard and Sons, “specialists in new parks and dripping pools” and costing £700 to construct, the park is essentially Victorian with a mixture of formal and natural styles. Dublin City Council took over the park in 1934 and has developed flower gardens and a play area while retaining the original design.


Harold's Cross was an execution ground for the city of Dublin during the 18th century and earlier. In the 14th century the gallows there was maintained by the Archbishop. The memorial cross at Harold's Cross was sculpted by local Sculptor/stonemason, Mr Joseph Courtney.



13/10/2023

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Today I had to visit the Harold's Cross area of Dublin so I took the opportunity to visit Mount Jerome Cemetery where two of my Grandparents are buried even though they were Catholics and were involved in the 1916 Easter Rising.


Mount Jerome Cemetery & Crematorium is situated in Harold's Cross on the south side of Dublin, Ireland. Since its foundation in 1836, it has witnessed over 300,000 burials. Originally an exclusively Protestant cemetery, Roman Catholics have also been buried there since the 1920s.


The cemetery is also known for its beautiful Victorian architecture, including the Victorian Chapel, which is still used for funeral services today. 



12/10/2023

HAIGH TERRACE AND MORAN PARK [AND MORAN PARK HOUSE]  001
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I worked in Dun Laoghaire for about fifteen years in total and my experience was that most of my co-workers from the town objected strongly to the planning and construction of this building while I thought that it was an excellent idea. 


The DLR Lexicon Building houses the main public library and cultural centre of Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown County Council (DLR CC). It has attracted controversy, with opponents critical of its massive façade and its €36.6m cost at a time of austerity in Ireland, and supporters praising its interior, usability, and environmentally responsible construction.


The site chosen was Moran Park, a partially derelict public park with a popular bowling green, running perpendicular to the coastline down an escarpment. I was based there [Harbour House - I thought that it was known as Marconi House] for about two years back in the 1970s and in the later 1990 I was based in Haigh Terrace and by then Moran Park had become a no-go area at night because of anti-social activity relating to drugs. We were advised by management not to be in the immediate area after 7pm. Towards the end of my career I returned to Dun Laoghaire to work for Ericsson which was located at the Aldephi Centre [now Adelphi Plaza] which was very close to Moran Park


The site was chosen because it was already owned by DLR CC and would link The Metals (Queens Road) on the busy seafront to the north with George's Street.


NOTE: Guglielmo Marconi sent the results of the Kingstown [now Dun Laoghaire] regatta from a steam tug named The Flying Huntress beyond Dún Laoghaire harbour to his assistant and shore receiver in the Harbourmaster’s house [Moran Park House], which currently houses the Design Gallery between the Lexicon library and the Pavilion complex. This was the very first time wireless technology was used in journalism.


Moran Park is now situated in front of dlr LexIcon, Dún Laoghaire. It was redesigned as part of the development of dlr LexIcon and now has two squares. The raised upper tier has expansive views across Dún Laoghaire Harbour and includes the dramatic 'Christ the King' sculpture; whilst the lower level includes a green area and planting next to the refurbished Moran House.

Moran Park House, which was acquired by the Council in 1954, was constructed for the Harbour Master in 1845 and was originally known as “Harbour House”. It was renamed Moran Park House in 1961. It is a building of national significance and is recorded as being the location of the first wireless transmission by Gugielmo Marconi on 20th July 1898. Moran park House now houses the Irish Design Gallery.

11/10/2023

THE WATER FEATURE AT THE DLR LEXICON [MORAN PARK DUN LAOGHAIRE 10 OCTOBER 2023] 001
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The attractive water feature takes up a 1.5m change of level and is full of movement and interest. The central island provides ventilation for the car park, which is obscured by bamboo groves.


dlr LexIcon is a new public library for Dún Laoghaire designed to provide a new landmark between the town and coastline. The four-storey structure was built into the existing slope creating two ground floor areas and a pair of quieter upper levels that offer a mixture of both social and intimate spaces. 


The building re-interprets the traditional idea of a library by delivering a cultural, modern building that encourages social and community interaction as rigorously as it facilitates enquiry and learning. The library will also house separate reading rooms, a junior library, an auditorium, a cafe, an art gallery, a history department with study spaces, as well as staff facilities.


While renewable sources provide the primary energy for the building, gas-fired and biomass fired boilers supply the heating.


Nine wind cowls provide ventilation from a passive system that uses the wind and the stack effect to generate fresh air and extract stale air to and from every room in the building.


It also provides for heat recovery and has been developed to harness natural wind currents to create air pressure sufficient to provide a plentiful and healthy fresh air supply with no energy cost.

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