27/09/2023

LEHAUNSTOWN PARK HOUSE NEAR TULLY CHURCH [HAS BEEN UNOCCUPIED FOR YEARS] 001
LEHAUNSTOWN PARK HOUSE NEAR TULLY CHURCH [HAS BEEN UNOCCUPIED FOR YEARS] 002

Approximately 400m from the Tully Church complex stands Lehaunstown Park House. Remarkably, this ‘modern’ house encases the remains of the documented Lehaunstown Castle. The juxtaposition of a Tower House/castle with an Early Medieval ecclesiastical site has been recorded elsewhere in County Dublin, for example at Tallaght, Dalkey, Swords and Portrane. This historic relationship between Tully Church and Lehaunstown Castle should be fully respected in the projected ongoing development in the immediate area.


The property is on the market and is described as follows:


Lehaunstown Park House comprises a period residence and stables situated within secluded grounds of approximately 2.88 ha (7.11 acres).

The main house measures approximately 135 sq m (1,453 sq ft) over two storeys and is in need of full renovation. The property has an abundance of ornate period features revealing the history of the house which dates back to circa 16th Century.

Adjacent to the house is an impressive double-height L-shaped stable building of granite construction with decorative red brick cladding extending to approximately 225 sq m (2,422 sq ft). Both buildings are protected structures and will therefore need to be retained in any future development.

The perimeter of the site is delineated by mature hedgerows and a variation of stone walls that have been sensitively restored. A gated entrance with traditional high pillars and a sweeping driveway provide access to the site from an internal estate road.


The spelling of the name has varied considerably over time, and in some periods was almost indistinguishable from Loughlinstown, the name of which also varied. The spelling Laughanstown was adopted and fixed at the time of the original Ordnance Survey in the 1830s. However, the evidence suggests that the name used locally was Lehaunstown, and this was noted by the Boundary Survey in the 1820s. Local usage did not change as a result of the Ordnance Survey’s attempt to impose a new spelling and this is the spelling now used in official documents.



27/09/2023

TULLY HIGH CROSS [LEHAUNSTOWN LANE NEAR CHERRYWOOD VILLAGE] 001
TULLY HIGH CROSS [LEHAUNSTOWN LANE NEAR CHERRYWOOD VILLAGE] 002
TULLY HIGH CROSS [LEHAUNSTOWN LANE NEAR CHERRYWOOD VILLAGE] 003
TULLY HIGH CROSS [LEHAUNSTOWN LANE NEAR CHERRYWOOD VILLAGE] 004
TULLY HIGH CROSS [LEHAUNSTOWN LANE NEAR CHERRYWOOD VILLAGE] 005
TULLY HIGH CROSS [LEHAUNSTOWN LANE NEAR CHERRYWOOD VILLAGE] 008
TULLY HIGH CROSS [LEHAUNSTOWN LANE NEAR CHERRYWOOD VILLAGE] 007

Note:  The cross shown here was saved from destruction by James Grehan in the later part of the nineteenth century. The road next to the cross was being lowered and James Grehan had this small wall built and the cross placed upon it at its original height.


I got the tram to Laughanstown (different spelling) I walked along a deserted country lane, access is now limited to walkers and cyclists, until I got to Tully Church and Graveyard. I then crossed over M50 Motorway to Heronsford Lane and explored part of Ticknick Park which I hope to explore in greater detail next month.


Tully was an important diocesan centre in the 1st Millennium AD. It is referred to in the early literature as Tulach na nEpscop (‘the Hill of the Bishops’). The church is mentioned in the Martyrology of Óengus, a 9th century text with 11th /12th century notes, and the late 15th century text, but drawing from earlier now lost manuscripts, the Book of Lismore.


In the 8th century the territory in south-east County Dublin and north-east County Wicklow came under the control of the Uí Briúin, hence Uí Briúin Cualann.


The church of Tully and the surrounding lands later fell under the control of Hiberno-Norse settlers. The lands of Tully were granted by Sitric Mac Turcaill to the Holy Trinity (Christ Church) in Dublin. In fact, the remains of a nearby house-site associated with this period has been discovered and excavated in recent years.


Aerial photography has established the presence of two subsurface ditched enclosures surrounding the church. The original entrance to the enclosure would appear to be to the south-east. Entrances similarly positioned are a notable aspect of many other early ecclesiastical sites.


The nave of the present church would appear to date to the latter part of the 11th century. The perfectly realised archway connecting the nave to the chancel is probably later in date, late 12th/early 13th century.


To the immediate north-west of the church remains there stands a 12th century High Cross featuring a relief carving of a bearded bishop. This cross would appear to be standing on the western perimeter of the outer enclosure.


A 10th century ringed-High Cross was repositioned along the adjacent laneway in the 19th century. Four grave slabs of Rathdown-type were formerly located at the church site. These slabs date to 10th/12th centuries and feature designs that are paralleled on objects discovered in the Viking excavations in Dublin. They may have served as grave markers of Christianised Hiberno-Norse settlers.


In the wake of the Norman/Angevin intervention in the late 12th century, the graveyard at the church became the traditional burial ground of the Walshes of Carrickmines Castle, one of the dominant families in the locality.


Approximately 400m from the Tully Church complex stands Lehaunstown Park House. Remarkably, this ‘modern’ house encases the remains of the documented Lehaunstown Castle. The juxtaposition of a Tower House/castle with an Early Medieval ecclesiastical site has been recorded elsewhere in County Dublin, for example at Tallaght, Dalkey, Swords and Portrane. This historic relationship between Tully Church and Lehaunstown Castle should be fully respected in the projected ongoing development in the immediate area.




27/09/2023

TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  001
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  002
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  003
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  004
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  005
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  006
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  007
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  008
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  009
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  010
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  011
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  012
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  013
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  014
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  015
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  016
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  017
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  018
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  019
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  020
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  021
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  022
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  023
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  024
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  025
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  026
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  027
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  028
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  029
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  030
TICKNICK PARK [I ONLY EXPLORED A SMALL SECTION BUT I HOPE TO VISIT AGAIN IN  THE NEAR FUTURE]  031

In some of the images you may notice a chimney or tower in the distance ... it is a structure that marks the location of the Ballycorus Leadmines. In 1807, The Ballychorus Leadmine was built after a discovery in the 1770s that an additional quantity of lead could be extracted from a furnace if the vapors could be trapped long enough to precipitate the lead. A furnace was built at Ballychorus that was connected to the top of the hill by a 2km granite flue. This was designed to carry away the poisonous particles. The tower was originally one-third taller and is regarded to be the finest example in the UK and Ireland.



Ticknick Park is primarily intended to provide formal recreational facilities in the form of grass playing pitches.  The pitches will be (or have been) constructed to a high level of functionality and suitable for use all year round, due to a high-capacity drainage system. A path circuit around the playing pitches, is wide enough to accommodate maintenance and emergency vehicles. Adjacent to the pitches will be a changing facility with toilets and ancillary facilities, along with parking and turning space for coaches for team transport, as well as service vehicle access.  These will be accessed by pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles via a route from the existing M50 Lehaunstown Lane bridge. Also included in the park layout is a maintenance facility for the whole of Cherrywood.


The importance of external and internal views within the park has been accounted for in the design.  Appropriate planting and the management of existing trees and vegetation (crown-lifting and thinning, pruning of vegetation) are proposed to maintain and enhance certain important views and vistas.


Ticknick Park is a 19-hectare park with:


  • four grass pitches including a full GAA pitch
  • ancillary facilities including seating, signage paths, cycle stands and soft landscaping
  • single storey changing facility with four changing rooms
  • toilet facilities, storage, ancillary accommodation
  • cycle parking facilities
  • Currently Ticknick Park is accessed via a pedestrian walkway via the agricultural bridge over the M50 utilising the shared pedestrian and cycle paths. Visitors travelling by vehicle should park in the temporary carpark which allows for 83 spaces, including four disabled user parking bays, three coach bays, and four motorcycle spaces.





26/09/2023

TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 001
TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 002
TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 003
TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 004
TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 005
TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 006
TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 007
TICKNICK CAR PARK AT MERCER VALE [THIS MIGHT BE A TEMPORARY PARKING AREA] 008

All of this is new to me and I had difficulty identifying the individual elements of the overall project but it would appear that this is Mercer Vale Ticknick Park car park {this is a complicated name]


The emerging town of Cherrywood will have a population in the region of 26,000, with over 8,800 new homes including a minimum of 10% social housing units, spread over the new Town Centre and three smaller Village Centres with superior transport links including an enhanced bus service, five Luas stops, and pedestrian and cycle friendly greenways throughout. In addition, there will be two post primary and four primary schools. Note: Currently there are two unused tram stops in the immediate area and three that `are in use.


Ticknick Park is a 19-hectare park with:


four grass pitches including a full GAA pitch

ancillary facilities including seating, signage paths, cycle stands and soft landscaping

single storey changing facility with four changing rooms

toilet facilities, storage, ancillary accommodation

cycle parking facilities


Currently Ticknick Park is accessed via a pedestrian walkway via the agricultural bridge over the M50 utilising the shared pedestrian and cycle paths. Visitors travelling by vehicle should park in the temporary carpark which allows for 83 spaces, including four disabled user parking bays, three coach bays, and four motorcycle spaces.





24/09/2023

ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 001
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 002
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ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS 030
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS
ROEBUCK ENTRANCE TO UCD CAMPUS

Cycling or walking is without doubt the greenest way to reach the Campus and has major health benefits! UCD has a number of dedicated pedestrian and cyclist entrances, which motorists cannot enter.


I used this entrance twice and on the second visit I actually entered the campus via the Rosemount entrance and left via the Roebuck gate in order to catch the 17 bus to Dundrum.


I used my Apply iPhone XR for the second visit and it had been updated to iOS 17 a few hours earlier and it kept crashing and overheating to the extent that it was close to unusable. A later update to 17.0.1 has resolved the more serious issues but I am st1ll having problems with the device



In 2011 the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney TD, today officially opened Rosemount Environmental Research Station, a major new research station in the heart of UCD’s Belfield campus. The Minister welcomed the new development at UCD which provides cutting edge facilities for a diverse range of research disciplines including Plant Biology, Plant Biotechnology, Horticulture, Agriculture and Environmental and Evolutionary Biology.


There has been a crèche on the UCD campus for approximately 30 years. Over this time the crèche has seen many developments, growing from an initial forty-place facility into a nursery that now has provision for over a hundred children. The current purpose-built centre was refurbished in 2006 and the most recent expansion was completed in Jan 2011. Oakmount Creche is situated near the Clonskeagh/Rosemount/Roebuck entrances of the campus. Located beside a beautiful woodland area, this one-storey building has three gardens at its disposal where the children explore, have fun and play games in safety.







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